Sunday, March 3, 2013

Growing Garden Huckleberry

This is the second year that I've grown Garden Huckleberry from seed.  The first year I only planted 2 and had an okay crop but then I let the plants die.  Ooopps!  Garden Huckleberries produce fruit the first year which is why they are a great berry to try in your home garden.

Baby Garden Huckleberry
I grow everything from seed!  It's not that difficult and that way I know exactly what I'm getting from start to finish.  All of the seeds I plant (from Mary's Heirloom Seeds) are untreated, organic, non-gmo heirloom seeds.

Plant seeds in moist soil and cover with approx 1/4 inch of soil.  Seeds should germinate within 2 weeks.  Seedlings should receive at least five hours of sun every day.  I start seeds in my laundry room where I have large windows and plenty of space.  Once the seedlings grow about 2 inches tall they will be transplanted to large pots.  Our house move is stalled for 1 more month so everything is going in containers.
Plants should be bushy.  This one needed more fertilizer or compost.
Garden Huckleberries like rich soil and partial shade.  Adding compost or chicken manure will increase the plant yield.  I plant my Huckleberry when I plant my tomatoes and fertilize the same as well.  Growing Huckleberries are very easy and not much bothers the plant.  The plants have some cold tolerance and fruit may continue to ripen after light frosts.
Small basket of berries from 1 bush
Green fruit are mildly poisonous, just like potato leaves or green potatoes. The fruits do not taste like much when picked, sometimes they can can be bitter. A pleasing berry taste does come through surprising well when it is cooked with  sugar. It can be used as a viable substitute for blueberries in pies, jams and syrup.


You can purchase heirloom Garden Huckleberry seeds
from Mary's Heirloom Seeds.
That's all for now!  Any questions?

Depending on the day I'm joining these parties and Wildcrafting Wednesday.

29 comments:

Sara Dixon said...

Do you cover your seedlings with saran wrap? I never have, but my grandma does. What do you suggest?

www.mrsdixxxon.blogspot.com

mary_smith said...

Hi Sarah! I don't cover my seedlings because it's warm enough here. If it's cold where you are or you do not have a warm spot to plant your seeds then saran wrap would work.

Faith @ Artistic31Mama said...

I've never grown these before but would love to try. I'm going to pin this to my garden board! I like how you planted them in a pot; might try that. I'm getting excited for spring! Thank you!

I'm visiting from "Mop It Up Mondays!

www.artistic31mama.com

Stacee said...

I've never had huckleberries, do they taste similar to blueberries? They look yummy.

Visiting from Follow Who? Hop.
http://www.dinkylee.com At the End of the Day...

mary_smith said...

Faith, thanks for the pin!! Pin away!

Stacee, they do not taste like blueberries. They can be bitter or just bland. BUT, cook them with sugar for jam or syrup and they are delicious!

Yelle said...

Hello from the blog hop! And oh my, how wonderful would it be if I could have my own huckleberries!

Faith @ Artistic31Mama said...

Mary - Thanks for the tip! I'll definitely do that! :-)

Kathy Shea Mormino said...

Thank you for sharing with the Clever Chicks Blog Hop this week; I hope you’ll join us again!


Cheers,
Kathy Shea Mormino

The Chicken Chick

http://www.The-Chicken-Chick.com

Cynthia Landrie said...

I have never grown nor eaten a huckleberry. I think I will have to give them a try. I have a large patio and would try them in a pot!

Thank you for linking up to the In and Out of the Kitchen link party! I love reading about your back to basics!

Cynthia at http://FeedingBig.com

Jonell said...

I just found you by way of Heather's Stringtown Home..both your fb and this blog catch my interest...I shall return TO DEVOUR IT at leisure -We make use of the yard space we have for a bit of gardening and I am always trying to choose new herbs that will thrive in my space...see you again soon..Look me up at my blog if you will..would love to add you as a FOLLOWER

Jonell

monicaplatz said...

Hi! Your newest follower here from the blog hop! So glad to have found your site!
Monica
http://monicasrrr.blogspot.com

Rachael Cleveland said...

I've heard so much about huckleberries, but had no idea they were this easy! I'm sold. Thanks for sharing. :)

Countrified Hicks said...

I am going to look into getting some of these seeds. Thanks for letting us know about them and thanks for linking up with us this week.

wilson tom said...

Hi I am a new follower to your lovely blog (Via GFC)and it really feel pleasure meeting new awesome bloggers like you. Found you through Work It Wednesday.

my blog: www.wilsontom.blogspot.com

hsmominmo said...

a friend gifted me with huckleberry seeds this winter. So glad to hear you can start them indoors and then transplant. We'll be starting them right away!
(visiting from An Oregon Cottage)

Wanderer said...

Hello! Thanks for joining us on Wildcrafting Wednesday! I didn't know about garden huckleberries. Are they part of the nightshade family? Hope you'll come back next week!
Sharon

Katherines Corner said...

I've never had a huckleberry but my husband used to eat them when he was young. Thank you for sharing at the hop xo

Michele said...

I am so happy gardening season is right around the corner!

http://www.mrsgardengirl.blogspot.com/2013/03/hooked-on-crochetno-pun-intended.html

http://woodlotfarms.com/

Tami Von Zalez said...

I wonder if they would do well in my N. Calif. climate?

Popped in from Photo Friday.

thriftshopcommando.blogspot.com

mail4rosey said...

Very few things are as delicious as fresh berries.

I'm visiting today from the No Rules Weekend Blog Party.

Kristi said...

I am trying my hand at a few different types of berries this year, but I hadn't thought of trying huckleberries. Hmmm...I'm interested.

I'd like to invite you to share this post and up to two others at Farm Girl Blog Fest #23, which is live right now. You would be a great addition to the wonderful posts that are shared!

Farm Girl Friday Blog Fest #23

Hope to see you there!
~Kristi@Let This Mind Be in You

Lisa Lynn said...

Hi Mary!
I grew them once, long ago...but didn't really know what to do with them :) I should try them again someday.

Thanks for sharing your talent on The Creative HomeAcre Hop!
Our next party goes live Sunday morning at:
http://www.theselfsufficienthomeacre.com/2013/03/the-creative-homeacre-hop-6.html

If you have a blog hop, please check out The Linky Love Party...a place to share your parties with other bloggers! Grab the button for an easy way to search for parties every week!
http://www.theselfsufficienthomeacre.com/2013/03/lets-party.html

D @ The Shady Porch said...

I don't believe we've ever had huckleberries. They look really good. My family hasn't found a berry it doesn't like so I'm sure we'd love these too! Thanks for sharing at the Rock N Share!

Ladies Holiday said...

LOL-I didn't know huckleberries were real- you learn something new every day!

THanks for linking up on the Photo Friday Blog hop- and enlightening me!

Black Fox Homestead said...

Huh. I'll have to try these. We've never grown huckleberries before. I wonder how they would do down here.

~Jenny

Shatzi @ Love and Laundry said...

I am so surprised that you can grow huckleberries! I'm from Idaho and huckleberries are one of our claim to fame's. They grow wild here in the mountains but I have found no one that can successfully grow them in a garden. I don't know if it's true, but I heard that they actually need to grow at a higher elevation to grow best. That may explain why they can withstand a light frost...? Thanks so much for sharing at our Weekend Wonders Party!

Judy Goody said...

Everyone needs to note that the "Garden" Huckleberry is not a huckleberry at all, not even in the same family. They are in the Nightshade family (tomatoes, peppers) and are easy to grow, unlike true huckleberry plants. Don't try to grow true huckleberry plants unless you have high organic/acidic soil and are at the right elevation. Unlike the Garden Huckleberry, true huckleberries will not produce for several years, if you are successful growing them

Maria Tait said...

Maria Tait.

Hi everyone. I bought 2 huckleberry plants from the nursery about 6 years ago. They only started making flowers about 4 years later but no fruit. Since then lots of flowering but the little green fruit would just drop. They get lots of manure and water. I live in South Africa. We have wonderful sunny weather. Light frost and no snow. Could someone pls tell me what I need to do more.

Melody Savage said...

I have 3 nursery purchased huckleberry plants here in Northern utah. They grew very well and have huge black berries, but have very little flavor. They almost have a tomato like flavor, but are definitely not sweet like a blueberry. They are fairly firm, and I am hoping they will change flavor as they ripen and soften more. Does anybody know if these will sweeten up or does this variety just taste nasty?