Thursday, September 18, 2014

DIY Ginger Bug

What is a "Ginger Bug" and how is this healthy?  Two great questions!

What is a Ginger Bug?

From Nourished Kitchen, "A slurry of fermented yeast and sugar water, Ginger Bug captures beneficial microorganisms like wild yeasts and bacteria in the same way that sourdough starter does.  The wild microorganisms, eat away at the sugar in the Ginger Bug, and produce carbon dioxide as a result.  When mixed with a flavored sweet tea, fruit juice or other base, the microorganisms in the ginger bug begin to consume the sugar in the tea or juice, and, as they do, they reproduce and emit carbon dioxide. The result is a fizzy and effervescent, naturally fermented soda that is rich in beneficial bacteria – critical to gut health and immune system function."

Benefits of a Ginger Bug

In the words of Sandor Katz (who has written several books on fermentation): “Fermented foods are alive.  Industrially processed food is dead.”
Here are just a few benefits of fermented foods.
  • Fermentation not only preserves nutrients, but breaks them down into more digestible forms.
  • Fermentation creates new nutrients; microbial cultures create B vitamins (including folic acid, riboblavin, niacin, etc.).
  • Fermentation removes toxins in food.
  • Some ferments function as antioxidants, scavenging harmful free radicals from the body.
  • Fermented foods are rich in lactobacilli (aka health enhancing probiotics like those found in yogurt); they promote the growth of healthy flora in the intestine which helps with digestion.



DIY Ginger Bug
To get started you'll need:
Fresh, Organic Ginger root
Organic raw sugar/unprocessed organic cane sugar
Glass Jars or large Glass container
Cheesecloth or coffee filter (to use as a lid)
De-clorinated, filtered Water  *Check out our affordable Walter Filter*

Directions:
Equal parts fresh ginger, organic cane sugar, and filtered water.
I used 2 Tablespoons fresh ginger, UNPEELED and grated
2 Tablespoons cane sugar
2 Tablespoons filtered water 
Mix these ingredients in a jar. I just tossed them into the jar, put the lid on, and swirled it around to combine.

Ginger Bug after 24 hours

Each day for 5-7 days, add the same equal parts of these three ingredients to the mixture:

2 Tablespoons fresh, grated ginger
2 Tablespoons cane sugar
2 Tablespoons water

I'll be sharing my daily fermentation updates at Mary's Kitchen.
Stop by and check out some of my recipes.

Equal parts fresh ginger, organic cane sugar, and filtered water
I used approximately 2 Tablespoons fresh ginger, peeled and grated
2 Tablespoons cane sugar
2 Tablespoons filtered water
Mix these ingredients in a jar. I just tossed them into the jar, put the lid on, and swirled it around to combine.
Each day for 5-7 days, add the same equal parts of these three ingredients to the mixture:
2 Tablespoons fresh, grated ginger
2 Tablespoons cane sugar
2 Tablespoons water
- See more at: http://mountainroseblog.com/diy-homemade-ginger-bug-fermented-sodas/#sthash.Lz9XDqRU.dpuf

7 comments:

Joanne DiPalo said...

Thank you so much for sharing your DIY Ginger Bug with Foodie Friends Friday party this weekend. Pinned/sharing. We look forward to seeing you again soon.

Joy Bee said...

This sounds interesting. Could it be used as a kind of homemade ginger ale? Once it's established how often does it need to be "fed"? I'm familiar(and comfortable) with sourdough and milk kefif I'll have to do more research on this. Pinning.

KC the Kitchen Chopper said...

I am always looking for new ways of getting fermented veggies etc into our diet. Ginger bug sounds perfect. Thanks for sharing at #theweekendsocial. Pinned! ;)

Mitzi said...

I've got a lot to learn about herbs and herbal remedies. I'm bookmarking your site!

Julie V said...

How informative. I love ginger, but I haven't tried anything like this.
When I have a stomachache, I like to dice up some fresh ginger root, put it in a tea infused, and then steep it in hot water for 5 minutes and add honey. I will have to try your tricks as well.

Cathy Carroll said...

I find it so amazing what I learn as I go through these links at Share It One More Time. Thank you so much for enlightening me in a whole new asect of health. Cathy

Vickie @ makingoursustainablelife.com said...

I have been using my ginger bug for several months now - taking out as much as I need to make ginger ale - but leaving behind enough to get the next bug ready. The ginger ale is great! It's fizzy, but not the hard fizz that you get from the store bought stuff. I've tried adding it to a wort of plum juice and another with orange juice intead of the good old fashioned lemon, and all turn out amazing! I will be interested to see how yours turns out. BTW - keep your fermented items separate as much as possible - you don't want the sourdough yeast crossing with the kefir or the ginger bug. I have sourdough, kombucha and my ginger bug and they are all in separate rooms/cupboards!