Saturday, December 1, 2012

In the Garden Spotlight: Marglobe Tomato

My first "spotlight" post was the Pink Oxheart Tomato.  I am currently growing them in the garden but they are just seedlings.  I had terrific success growing Marglobe Tomatoes in my Florida garden.

Aren't they Gorgeous?
75 days. Determinate.  Marglobe tomatoes can be traced back to 1917 but were introduced by the USDA in 1925.  Medium size red fruit make excellent canning tomatoes or sliced for a sandwich or salad.  Good size and uniform deep scarlet color, 7 to 10 ounce fruits.  Great for humid climates.

I highly recommend heirloom marglobe tomatoes.  They are especially great for Florida gardeners as they grow well in humid climates.

For growing instructions check out the Growing from Seed page.
If you intend to grow organically or you would like to reduce your dependency on expensive treatments, use Companion planting.

Companion plants include:  asparagus, basil, beanborage, carrots, celery, chive, cucumber, garlic, head lettuce, marigold, mint, nasturtium, onion, parsley, pea, pepper, marigold, pot marigold and sow thistle.
Borage
 I especially like to grow borage and calendula around my tomatoes.  They are beautiful flowering plants, attract beneficial insects and can be eaten in salads.  Calendula is great for tinctures or beauty products.
Calendula
This is a Garden Spotlight series!

2 comments:

Mia @ The Chronicles of Chaos said...

Newest follower from Super Sunday Sync! Goodness, those tomatoes are beautiful! I have always wanted to grow my own, but I was definitely born without the green thumb gene! :) Hope you have a great evening.

Sparkling said...

THose tomatoes look great. I am a big grower of tomatoes but this year, they got the blight, so I think I need to stop tomatoes for a while. The whole region was blighted this year, so I'm afraid the spores will be around for a while. I'm all organic, so not chemicals for me! I don't know how I'll live without growing tomatoes next year. We're in New England and it's well past growing season, but I still have a few crazy tomato plants in the greenhouse that are still ripening. Glad to see what calendula and borage look like. I already read about them but I've never bothered to look them up. I should try using them next year!